AmerGovt,EnemeyState,BlogPost1

‚ÄčNormally when I think of the government, I'm reminded of order and law.  Order is peace, and laws keep things in check.  Growing up, I have heard conspiracy theories and why people should never trust the government, but for the most part I've never seen or experienced any of these things in real life.  Coming into the movie, I already expected somethings to be exaggerated for the sake of keeping things interesting and moving at a good pace. In the opening of the movie, the government is painted in a much darker way than it is usually portrayed. It makes me feel as though the government can't be trusted with the better interest of it's people because of corruption. I thought it was interesting that there were government agents watching Will smith, and one of the mob members from the floor of an adjacent building. This could be a little annoying after a while, but it doesn't violate the rights of anyone, considering they are in public, and not making physical contact. The (NSA?) took it too far , however, when they decided to break into Will smiths home, and plant hidden cameras. Another thing I thought was both amazing and unnerving, was how easily and quickly they gained access to his financial reports, full name, adress, social security information, and the people he contacted. Seeing as how they government keeps track of this information anyway, I think its still wrong to go in and grab this information at the loose chance that there may be a connection. I think it would be acceptable for an individuals freedoms to be restricted, when they have known connections to terrorist acts, organizations, or have been convicted of more serious crimes. On the same hand, its kind of tough to combat violent attacks in today's world, considering the fact that people can decide to plan there own terrorist attacks after being persuaded to do so by actual terrorist organizations, or for no apparent reason at all. There needs to be some type balance that keeps people safe, without taking away their rights to privacy.

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