Negative Space Reflection/Blog:

‚ÄčNegative space drawings are darings where one specific object in the drawing is shaded black while the rest is left white. I could figure out which object should be shaded in my cut out (the tree, in this piece the shaded or 'black' part would be the orange background) because when we started our projects we had a reference sheet with the picture we where creating. So I traced the borders of my tree and cut out the inside of the shaded lines. Creating a stencil, so then I took my green paper and put it under my self made stencil, tracing the lines. Turning my green paper into a sketched picture of a tree. Then all I did was cut out the tree accordingly. Once all that was done I pasted my pieces on according to the opposite side of the paper which you can see in the picture below. For my sketches in my book (the pencil sketches) I drew my chair and my cup then I just shaded my background to define the negative spaces. Negative space helps the artist's eye see all aspects of the sketch they are working with. A classic example of this is Rubin's Vase. This is just a picture of a yellow vase with a white background. Although- if you make it a negative picture by coloring the vase white and the background black you see that it is really an optical illusion, with two faces looking at each other. In short it gives you a full unadulterated view of what your working with. Seeing in negative space in fact enhances the artist's and viewer's comprehension of the art. I say this because you can look at something in color and you see whats there, but if you take the color away...you see each little pen stroke, detail, and quirk giving the work more personality and originality. 
Photo on 5-2-13 at 4.21 PM
Photo on 5-2-13 at 4.21 PM
Photo on 5-2-13 at 4.11 PM
Photo on 5-2-13 at 4.11 PM
Photo on 5-2-13 at 4.20 PM
Photo on 5-2-13 at 4.20 PM

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