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Philly Love Note

Manna-Symone

Favorite Spot: The Academy of Natural Sciences
About Me: I am an 18 year old high school student and employee at the Academy of Natural Science. I am also originally from New Jersey. 

Current Home: Eastwick section of Philadelphia 

Years in Philadelphia: 5

Dear Philly,
Our relationship started a bit rocky. It was like you spoke one language and I another. You were so loud with your blaring sirens and constant chatter. Life for you never seemed to take a break. I had nightmares about the never ending patter of foot steps on your concreate. As a farm girl all I wanted was some grass, just a tree or two would have done it but for the first 3 years I saw nothing but a small tuff or two of greenery. Eventually, you would grow on me. I found small green oases around the city that reminded me of home where the smell of nature me the chaotic hustle and bustle of the city. In myself developed a hybrid that was urbanely savvy as it was rurally. I learned how to appreciate you for what you are, a collection of opposites and similarities all tucked away into different corners of the city but available for all to enjoy. It is because of you that I have learned to embrace diversity and thrive in places where it is prevalent.  Thank you.


Yours truly,

Manna-Symone 
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Philly Love Note

Favorite Spot: Center City

About Me: Student, activist

Years in Philly: 18 years

Current Home: North East Philly


Dear Philly,


From your Killadelphia days to the long summers of soccer in the park. You're not half bad. All the way up in the North East and the term, down to South Broad. I love you for the Flyers, and the Phillies too. Hell even the Eagles, no matter how bad they can be at times. Here's to the dogs days riding down Broad causing chaos, or the nights with fellow Flyers fans, and all the times we've talking shit about the Penguins, Pittsburgh the Rangers and the Mets. An amazing ode to Philly. I'll love you always!

Thanks for all the good times.
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Hamlet Close Reading

   Hamlet and Ophelia are in argument that gets critical after Ophelia puts an end to her relationship with Hamlet. Ophelia rejected Hamlet in multiple ways, one way was giving back things that he had given her such as letters he had written her expressing his feelings in depth. Hamlet, is not accepting it at all, he is hurt and very upset by what Ophelia is saying. They begin to go at. 

   As a matter of fact, you can see how upset Hamlet is in the beginning of his little speech when Hamlet says, "Go thee (to) a nunnery. Why wouldst thou be a breeder of sinners?" Nunnery means a convent, a convent is a community where priests, religious brothers, religious sisters, or nuns gather and live together. All of the same sex. But also it could be used in a different manner, used to refer to brawdy house, brawdy house is a place or community where men can visit prostitutes.   He is basically referring that Ophelia is a prostitute, the love of his life of being a sinful and wrong woman. She should not birth any children, because if she does then there will be more people like her which are sinners in the world.

   Looking a little further down, Hamlet is speaking about himself, he says he himself is an "indifferent honest." It sounds like he flipping his words around when he is finished his thought, "but yet I could accuse me of such things that it were better my mother had not borne me." Hamlet is far from innocent or a person you could look up to a saint in the play he switches up his feelings. 

    One example is Act 1 Scene 5, when his two friends Horatio and Marcellus run back and inform him that they have seen and spoken to the ghost of his father. One night Hamlet stands watch with Horatio and Marcellus, and sees the ghost, which is his father. The ghost takes Hamlet away, to talk to him. He says that he was murdered by Claudius which is his brother, the new king. His father tries to convince Hamlet into murdering the new king of Denmark, step dad Claudius. 


"Murder?


Murder most foul and most unnatural murder.


But this most foul, strange, and unnatural." ( Lines 32-34)


"O, my prophetic soul! My uncle!


Ay, that incestuous, that adulterate beast." ( Lines 48-49)


The ghost Hamlet's fathers ghost is speaking about his brother, like an animal.


"So, uncle, there are you. Now to my word.


It is "adieu, adieu, remember me.


I have sworn't." (Lines 117-119)

The ending words are Hamlet saying goodbye goodbye, remember me. 


   Hamlet goes on throughout the disagreement with Ophelia in a different way. When he says to Ophelia "I am very proud, revengeful, ambitious, with more offenses at my back than I have thoughts to put them in, imagination to give them space, or time to act them in." It sounds like Hamlet is speaking to Ophelia like he is in higher power. Like he is above her. He is saying that everyone messes up, and its normal. But somethings just cant be forgiven.

    As he continues in the talk with Ophelia he has a sudden change in character, "What should such fellows as I do crawling between earth and heaven? While Hamlet is saying this line, it sounds rather frustrated, like something is bothering him. Does it have to do with his father? The ghost? "We are arrant knaves (all;) believe none of us. Go thy ways to a nunnery. Where's your father?," are Hamlet's last few words said to Ophelia during the argument. Telling her to go and look back at her sins and see what she has done. 

   Hamlet is just one of Shakespeare's great works of art. Shakespeare uses his writings and plays to real life. The way it is written is what makes it so well known and read around the world. All throughout Hamlet, Shakespeare uses a language that sets off the tone of the play.

Hamlet
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"Que Bellas" ubicado en Oeste Filadelfia

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Filadelfia. La Ciudad de Amor Fraternal. La ciudad de la cultural, la música, y la historia. Filadelfia es llena de muchos tipos de personas que se anda a lo larga de caminos differentes. De donde vengo yo, esta parte tiene la cultural, pero, igual a cada lugar, no es perfecto.
Soy Sasha Sapp. Con el pelo rizado y el tez clara, nunca he encajado con los demás alrededor de me. La gente era, y aún son, Africanos Americanos. Desde el grande emigración en los 1950’s, estes demás han sido la mayoría de la población. Sin embargo, este parte de la población han tenido algunas problemas con los jóvenes. Los jóvenes necesitan la inspiración, pero mi mural se prendó a los mujeres jóvenes. Mi mural estará ubicado en Oeste Filadelfia, la pared al lado de una casa en el 55th y Lansdowne. Elijo este lugar porque es al centro de mi barrio. Casi cada persona lo se pasan y es fácil a ver.     
Para mi, porque soy artista, casi todo es arte. El arte no necesita ser bonito y atractivo o sin controvertido. Arte es todo. Te daria sentimientos o mensajes de cualquier cosa porque sería una pinta, una canción, o aun un baile. Por eso, arte es simplemente la expresión de una persona o idea. Por lo tanto, mi pieza también, es arte. Mi mural se presenta una idea; les da un mensaje a las mujeres en mi barrio. Se usa los imágenes y las palabras para darle el mensaje. Ya dije este, pero el arte sería cualquier cosa, y mi mural se está incluido. Es muy importante tener el arte público. El arte público puede contar la historia, o cuenta algo sobre un lugar. Básicamente, el arte público le da orgulloso a una comunidad. Como lo veo yo, los hace sentir inspirado las personas que viven allí. Eso es el propósito.  
En mi mural, se puede ver una mujer joven que está mirando al cielo. Está debajo de las imágenes unas mujeres Africanas Americanas famosas. Son tres imágenes, y cada imagen se está rodeado de las líneas. Las líneas son rojos y azules, y se conectan uno al otro. La mujer al medio se representa todos los chicas en mi barrio. Tiene los ojos con la esperanza, y está sonriendo. Este es significativo para la esperanza en cada mujer. Las otras imágenes son de las mujeres famosas se corresponden con las frases alrededor de las. Usé estas palabras porque se describen las mujeres en las imágenes, pero, más importante, se describen todos de las mujeres Africanas Americanas. Las líneas y las palabras se están escrito con los colores rojo, verdes, o azul. Elegí estos porque se representan el pasión, la verdad, y la seguridad. En total, los temas presentados son la inspiración, la esperanza, apoderando los demás, la cultura, y la orgullosa de las mujeres.Quiso que comunicar la idea que las mujeres en mi barrio tienen otras mujeres que son inspiraciones. Las mujeres necesitan mensajes positivas y imágenes positivas de nuestras demas. Quiero mi pieza decir, “Somos mujeres Africanos Americanos, y somos hermosas, fuertes, y inteligentes.”
Para mi, mi pieza es directiva y se muestra que es el arte público. Una vez más, el arte público se sirve como una representación de una comunidad. Puede representar cualquier cosa sobre o alrededor de una comunidad. También, se puede decir algo a esa comunidad. Y esto es lo que hace mi mural. Mi pieza les dice a las mujeres que son bellas, fuertes, y poderosas. El mensaje se pretende inspirarlas. Por eso, me gusta mucho mi obra. Disfruto darles sentimientos buenos a los demás en cualquier lugar. Me da feliz cuando les doy felicidades a otros. Tomo esta idea en todos aspectos de la vida. Es importante cuidar para los otros. Por qué lo a mi respecta, el arte público es una manera a hacerlo. Por nuestros artes, nos inspiramos.
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MPyfrom- "Poderoso"

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Hola, me llamo Marina. Yo vivo en el Oeste de Filadelfia. Sin embargo, cuando yo era una bebe yo vivía con mi mama y papa en una casa pequeña. Después mi abuela se murió. Luego, nos mudamos a la casa de mi abuela. En la casa que vivo ahora, es mejor porque es más grande y cómoda. Pero la casa que era de mi abuela no era tan lejos de donde yo vivía. Nos mudamos cerca de la casa donde vivíamos antes. En mi barrio hay muchos americanos africanos. Sin embargo, hay otras razas representadas. Yo diría que mi comunidad tiene muchas personas de clase media. Muchas de las familias trabajan los trabajos normales de 9-5. También, la mayoría de los niños y las niñas van a la escuela pública en el barrio. La calle es muy pequeña, por lo tanto cada uno conoce a cada uno. Me gusta mi calle porque mis vecinos son simpáticos. En mi barrio, muchas familias tienen perros. En mi calle, hay un gran campo de béisbol. Por lo tanto, en el verano, un montón de gente ir al campo a divertirse y a hablar. Mi mural ubicado en la última casa cerca del campo de béisbol. La dirección es 5145 Ogden st, Filadelfia, 19139. Esta ubicación es mejor porque toda la comunidad puede ver el mural. También los coches conduciendo por la calle pueden ver el mural.
El arte puede representar emociones de una persona. Los diferentes colores usados pueden crear una historia. El arte público tiene muchas formas como grafiti, vandalismo y murales. Sin embargo, todos es arte.  Estoy de acuerdo de que todo puede ser el arte porque los gente diferentes tienen opiniones diferentes sobre el arte. Por lo tanto el arte de ellos van a crear arte diferente. Feo arte para mi, sería bonita arte para ti. Mi mural es una forma de arte porque representa mi cultura y emociones. Las piezas en mi mural es detallado y importante para el mensaje. Para mi, el propósito del arte público es permitir que a la gente de la comunidad para crear hermosas obras de arte y contar la historia que es importante para la cultura.
Mi mural tiene la palabra "Poderoso" porque se simboliza cómo las mujeres fuertes están en nuestra sociedad.También , el mural tengo tres mujeres de diferentes culturas. Representan las madres solteras que hay en el mundo. Las rayas de la cebra en el fondo representan la fuerza. He decidido un cebra porque unas cebras son animales grandes pero son muy huraños. Muchas mujeres tengo problemos. Sin embargo, ellos son callados porque ellos quieren guardar sus sentimientos personal.  Los cebras toman sus familia muy serios. Familia es realmente importante a ellos. Una cebra hembra es igual a mi mamá porque ella cuido de mi y es independiente. El tema en el mural es reconocer las dificultades de ser un solo madre.
Cuando la gente ve el mural, quiero entender que las dificultades de la madres solteras y respetan ellos.Yo creo que mi mural representa mi cultura y comunidad. El arte público es para artistas para expresar sus sentimientos y ser creativo. Entonces para este proyecto, quise que mi mural representa mamás solas independientes en el mundo. En general, creo que mi pintura mural es realmente bien. Amo las rayas de la cebra detalladas porque es diferente.


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Hamlet Close Reading

In the immortal work of the play writer Shakespeare, there is a play called Hamlet. Shakespeare decided that there should be several speeches that are very important to the story. There are also many things that help to contribute the importance of the story. Some depict a series of emotions that run through the characters. They help to explain more of what the individual character is feeling. The way that shakespeare decided to write the speeches is an excellent way to see the emotions coming off of the pages. 

One of the speeches that I decided to analyze is a speech given by one of the main characters Hamlet. He is going through a really rough time in his life with the passing of his father and the remarriage of his mother he gives off the most emotions through out the entire play. He has a lot of emotional and mental changes that we see through the writing of the speeches.With all that Hamlet is going through his mother and his uncle/stepfather are very worried about him and his abnormal behavior they decide to include some of Hamlet’s childhood friends to get the gist of what is going on. Hamlet gives a very emotional speech to his childhood friends.

In act two scene two of the play , the character Hamlet says “I will tell you why; so shall my anticipation prevent your discovery, an your secrecy to the King and Queen molt no feather I have of late, but wherefore I know not,lost all my mirth , foregone all customs of exercises, and indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me sterile promontory; this most excellent canopy, the air look you, this brave o’er-hanging firmament , this majestical roof, fretted with golden fire- why it appeareth nothing to me but foul and pestilent congregation of vapors.”(2.2)

The speech given here Hamlet is basically saying he has some suspicions of why they are visiting. Considering he hasn’t seen them in quite some time it is a little unusual for them to be there with him. He brings up the idea that they are there for the King and Queen (His mother and Uncle/Stepfather) to seek out information on why he has been acting so strange. He also says that he is feeling a little bit of betrayal that they have not been around for a long time and that they appeared all of a sudden  with the command from the king and queen. They have all of a sudden appeared and they have came with not good intentions. Hamlet showed a lot of emotions towards his childhood friends because he has been going through some things. He says he has not been the same. He doesn’t enjoy the same activities. He is not the same person. He doesn’t seem the think the same things are fun anymore and things just aren’t going as good as they could go for him. 

Hamlet Keynote
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Sara Nesbitt Hamlet Monologue

​Quote:

A damned defeat was made. Am I a coward?

Who calls me “villain”? Breaks my pate across?

Plucks off my beard and blows it in my face?

Tweaks me by the nose? Gives me the lie i' th' throat

Why, what an ass am I! This is most brave,

That I, the son of a dear father murdered,

Prompted to my revenge by heaven and hell,

Must, like a whore, unpack my heart with words

And fall a-cursing like a very drab,

A scullion! Fie upon ’t, foh!

About, my brain.—Hum, I have heard

That guilty creatures sitting at a play

Have, by the very cunning of the scene,

Been struck so to the soul that presently

They have proclaimed their malefactions.


Analysis: 

In Act 2 Scene 2, Hamlet delivers an intriguing monologue that leaves you with more questions than answers. While asking questions about himself, he uncovers meaning behind his father’s death. "Am I a coward? Who calls me “villain”? Breaks my pate across? Plucks off my beard and blows it in my face?" Hamlet says as he enters a room alone. Throughout the play, he questions his instincts, and goes deep down to the core about what he's truly experiencing, and what is just inside his head. In this specific scene, we see the angry and confused man who wants to find peace within himself, and find the truth about his fathers death. "Must, like a whore, unpack my heart with words, Why, what an ass am I!" This quote being my favorite, because Hamlet's realizing how crazy he really seems, and he's questioning his own thoughts. He is so upset with himself because his father was just killed, his mother married his uncle, he is in love with Ophelia, and yet all he can do is say words. That is by far my favorite line because I can relate to it. Sometimes when you are thinking so much all that comes out is words. It's good when we can express our feelings, but we want to do instead of say. I can relate to Hamlet completely. It makes you think not only about Hamlet and what he will entail, but also about yourself, and the questions you have been trying to decipher. Hamlet has been going through a difficult time, but he code switches depending on whom he interacts with. I like this scene from the play, because he's not putting on an act for anyone. In front of Ophelia, Polonius, and especially his uncle, he's not himself. He acts crazy and dramatic, but it's still not what he's truly feeling. When he went into the room and said, "I am now alone." you can tell he is relieved, that he can express his true feelings without anyone knowing. 

"That I, the son of a dear father murdered, prompted to my revenge by heaven and hell." he is saying here that his father had just been murdered, and he is ready to get his revenge. Then he goes on to say he needs to get himself together, because all he is doing right now is standing around talking about it. After talking, thinking, and planning, he said "That guilty creatures sitting at a play have, by the very cunning of the scene, been struck so to the soul that presently they have proclaimed their malefactions." This concludes the scene, and puts a halt to Hamlet's crazy thoughts for now. He remembers that people who face their deeds, admit what they have done, due to guilt. Hamlet may be crazy, or he may just want justice for his father. Putting on a play of a king being murdered and watching his uncle’s reaction is genus. I believe that Hamlet really isn't crazy, but just lost in his own thoughts. His emotions are out of control, but when he has time to be true to himself, and think for himself, is when you can tell he's just a man who wants answers and justice for his father.






hamlet 1
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Hamlet: Close Reading

Kate-as-Ophelia-in-Hamlet-kate-winslet-12007258-1023-465
Hamlet:
"Get thee to a nunnery. Why wouldst thou be a breeder of sinners? I am myself indifferent honest, but yet I could accuse me of such things that it were better my mother had not borne me. I am very proud, revengeful, ambitious, with more offences at my beck than I have thoughts to put them in, imagination to give them shape, or time to act them in. What should such fellows as I do crawling between earth and heaven? We are arrant knaves, all. Believe none of us. Go thy ways to a nunnery." (Act 3, Scene 1)
Hamlet ANA

Ophelia and Hamlet are in an intense argument after Ophelia rejects the continuous of her relationship with Hamlet. Ophelia returning Hamlet his love letters was her way of rejecting his love. Of course Hamlet doesn’t take this well at all. He is outraged by her actions in fact. Hamlet and Ophelia begin to lock horns. 

In the first couple sentences, Hamlet ultimately dismantles Ophelia’s ego when he says, “Get thee (to) a nunnery. Why wouldst thou be a breeder of sinners?” A nunnery means convent (used mockingly to refer to brothel). Brothel, is a house where men can visit prostitutes. So, he refers to Ophelia, who is his lover, as a prostitutes; a sinful woman. As a sinful woman, she shouldn’t born any child because then there will only be more sinners in the world. 

When you are directed towards the third sentence, Hamlet says that he is an “indifferent honest”. To be indifferent honest, you are reasonably virtuous, meaning good. But, he sounds a bit contradicting as he finishes the sentence. After all, Hamlet hasn’t been the complete angel in the story so far. For example, In Act 1, Scene 5, Hamlet is confronted by his father’s ghost. The ghost tells Hamlet that he was murdered by the new king of Denmark, Claudius. He then tries to connivence Hamlet to seek revenge for him by killing Claudius. If he won’t kill Claudius for him, at least kill Claudius for Denmark:

“Oh, horrible, oh, horrible, most horrible!

If thou hast nature in thee, bear it not.

Let not the royal bed of Denmark be

A couch for luxury and damnèd incest.

But howsoever thou pursuest this act,

Taint not thy mind, nor let thy soul contrive

Against thy mother aught. Leave her to heaven

And to those thorns that in her bosom lodge

To prick and sting her. Fare thee well at once.

The glowworm shows the matin to be near,

And 'gins to pale his uneffectual fire.

Adieu, adieu, adieu. Remember me.“ (Lines 78-91) 

Hamlet’s mind is set upon this and he responses to the naughty sin by saying,

“It is “Adieu, adieu. Remember me.”

I have sworn ’t.” (Lines 111-112) 

Hamlet goes on in a more reassuring way when he says to Ophelia, “I am very proud, revengeful, ambitious, with more offenses at my beck than I have thoughts to put them in, imagination to give them shape, or time to act them in.” It also seems as if Hamlet is trying to speck himself into higher spirits. He says that everyone has their fair share of flaws, but as long as a person can shape them into something good, then they’ll be fine. 

But then there is a sudden shift of tone in the next line when Hamlet says, “What should such fellows as I do crawling between earth and heaven?” It falls into a tone of confusion and anger. Was his father’s spirit on his heart? Does he think that he will end up like his spirit? Stuck between earth and heaven? Hamlet ends their argument by directing Ophelia again to go to a nunnery to repent and reflect upon her sins. But, shouldn’t Hamlet be the one doing so instead of Ophelia? 

In conclusion, Shakespeare uses his words to bring life into his text. Without his usage of certain words, his texts wouldn’t be valued. Throughout Hamlet, Shakespeare has a strong usage and play with his words. They can really set the tone for a text because they are the backbone. 
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Marching Soles Shoe Drive

Capstone Flyer.001
Please donate shoes to the Marching Soles capstone! There will be bins located on the second floor for the entire month of March. All proceeds will go to those in need via PlanetAid. If you have any questions please contact Mecca Sharrieff, at msharrieff@scienceleadership.orgThank you!

FAQs 

1) Can I donate just one shoe? Sure can!

2) Can I donate heels? Yup! Any shoe, any size. 

3) Where do proceeds go to? Planet Aid is an awesome organization that packages the donations and separates them based on quality. Those of a higher grade go to thrift stores in less fortunate countries. The lesser grade shoes/clothes are 'fixed' and then sent to disaster relief victims or others in need. 










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Ananda Knight Hamlet close reading Act 1 Scene 5

http://prezi.com/cafn5rx8chb1/hamlet/?kw=view-cafn5rx8chb1&rc=ref-31226553

Hamlet Analysis Act 1 Scene 5

Ananda Knight


I am thy father's spirit,

Doom'd for a certain term to walk the night,

And for the day confined to fast in fires,

Till the foul crimes done in my days of nature

Are burnt and purged away. But that I am forbid

To tell the secrets of my prison-house,

I could a tale unfold whose lightest word

Would harrow up thy soul, freeze thy young blood,

Make thy two eyes, like stars, start from their spheres,


Hamlet is written in old english and has its ways of presenting words and lines in which people today may have a hard time understanding. Even though the text may be a little hard to read the way in which Shakespeare is written makes it both interesting, and a learning experience. 

The Hamlet scene that I found really interesting was Act 1 Scene 5. In this scene/ act Hamlet is introduced to the ghost of his father. His father’s ghost comes to him one night. When he first opens up to Hamlet he tells him how he has sinned and his should has yet to enter the gates of heaven because of his many untold sins. Even though the ghost of Hamlets father comes to him and presents himself and tells him that he cant go to heaven until he is punished for his sins he still refuses to tell his son what the sins are exactly for his is forbid to tell them. 


When reading this at first I expected Hamlet and his fathers first words to be different. I thought that Hamlet and his father may have exchanged words like I miss you, how are you ect. 

I also expected Hamlet to seem a little scared or hesitant as to how his father is appearing to him and why he can see a ghost. One question I had was did Hamlet notice that the ghost was his father even before he came out and said I am thy fathers spirit. Another question I had was what were all of the sins that the ghost had been talking about.


When I think of a king I think of a good person someone who people come to for help, guidance, and leadership. As I read this scene I wonder what kind of sins could a king have against him keeping him from his entrance into heaven. This scene is powerful because not only does it show a relationship between Hamlet and his father but It leaves readers wondering and mind boggled. Readers will be left wondering because the ghost constantly reminds the readers about how his are to horrible to be told and that he is forbid to tell them. But why? What are they? what did he do? Why can he talk to his own son about it? These are all questions that went through my mind while reading the scene. This scene includes an excerpt that makes me to continue to read the book and hope that soon my questions are answered.


This scene has a good way of telling us about the ghost’s past. was Hamlets father really a bad person or a criminal. Is there a reason why the author held back the sins in which he committed and why did he describe them as being so traitorous. I feel like this scene covered a lot with a few lines.



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Shakespeare Hamlet Analysis

HAMLETSLIDESHOW
OPHELIA Oh, what a noble mind is here o'erthrown!— The courtier’s, soldier’s, scholar’s, eye, tongue, sword, Th' expectancy and rose of the fair state, The glass of fashion and the mould of form, Th' observed of all observers, quite, quite down! And I, of ladies most deject and wretched, That sucked the honey of his music vows, Now see that noble and most sovereign reason Like sweet bells jangled, out of tune and harsh; That unmatched form and feature of blown youth Blasted with ecstasy. Oh, woe is me, T' have seen what I have seen, see what I see! Ophelia was very powerful with her use of words in the monologue above. I have come to understand that overall, she was trying to say that Hamlet was always noble, but after what he said and did, she thinks he is lost in his own self. How he used to be scholarly, strong like a soldier, and to be one with much grace. How Hamlet him self was the rose of the state which he lived in. Meaning that he was someone that was looked at, like an elegant flower. Hamlet was always someone to look up to, and really admire as a person. What everything Ophelia thought he was as a person, she does not see anymore. One thing she says which is quite passionate is, “Th' observed of all observers, quite, quite down! And I, of ladies most deject and wretched,” I understood this to mean that out of all the women that were fond of Hamlet and fell for him the way she did, no one has ever been as miserable or upset as she is. I also seem to think that Ophelia always thought that Hamlet was so sweet and charming yet now he has been nothing but harsh and inconsiderate. She feels that how Hamlet use to act before is totally different from now, which is all affected by his insanity. Now that she see’s him as so insane, it makes her feel sorrow to see that he has changed and so different then before. Throughout reading Ophelia’s monologue over and over, I kept on thinking back to one certain movie and experience I have been apart of. In the movie John Tucker Must Die, there are these, three girls in different friend groups who go out with the same boy at the same time. The new girl in school notices this is happening and ends up telling them. Once all the girls find out, they’re heartbroken but want revenge. They use the new girl to get him by pretending to like him and go out with him, yet she actually falls for him, and falls for him hard. More then the other girls. Which is exactly what Ophelia did. She fell for Hamlet and when something bad happened, just like it did in the movie, they feel the worst pain. Worse then the other people and makes them feel confused. Just like Ophelia thought Hamlet was different this new girl thought this as well. She thought she saw another side of John Tucker, just like Ophelia thought she saw another side of Hamlet. Yet, over all both of their hearts end up being broken. This is a very modern day, teenage movie connection but it is also something that can happen to real life teenagers as well. Some fall in love with a boy and really fall for them. They think they know everything about this person and really see the good in them. See what other people don’t. They realize why some people fell for the person before because of how imaginable they really are. Until this one big thing happens, and everything falls apart. Their in shock, because they never even expected it at all, especially to the one they love, desire and look to for everything. They never saw this side of the person. How harsh they were and it felt very inconsiderate. The pain just goes right through them, as if the person they loved never really loved them back. This happens to teenagers just like it happened to Ophelia. Confused to what just happened. Like everything happened so fast, but still in shock from the person they thought they knew to the person they just saw.
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Shakespeare "to be or not to be" analysis

Hamlet, this play is base around the life of a Danish noble and the struggles he encounters in his life, but most importantly it’s about revenge of someone he loves most dearly. I will be analyzing a monologue he has in the middle of the play in the palace he is staying in.

 

Shakespeare has created the ability to connect the characters and their problems and/or situations with common problems and people. This quote from the play Hamlet, “To be, or not to be? That is the question—Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, Or to take arms against a sea of troubles, And, by opposing, end them?The idea of whether is it better to live or to die. The topic of suicide was frowned and shamed upon this point in time but it was a popular theme in English literature since the idea was very prevalent in the minds of the common public at the time. But I have come to the conclusion that Shakespeare himself didn’t mind the thought or the act of suicide. He talks more about how society brings misfortune more than it does fortune and that it would be okay to end it since it was indeed very frustrating and unfair. This point can be furthered in the second part of the lines.

 

            “To die, to sleep—No more—and by a sleep to say we end the heartache and the thousand natural shocks that flesh is heir to—’tis a consummation devoutly to be wished! To die, to sleep.” My assumption about how Shakespeare views death through this play is sleep. He views death as a constant sleep in which you can never awaken from. I believe that the concept of death as a long slumber became popular through the Hamlet play. Shakespeare was very popular at the time this play was shown and passed down through out the years. He also continues the concept of suicide and how it could be an alternative to dealing with all the hardships life has to offer.

 

            To sleep, perchance to dream—ay, there’s the rub, for in that sleep of death what dreams may come when we have shuffled off this mortal coil, must give us pause. There’s the respect that makes calamity of so long life.” This portion of the famous Hamlet monologue is just about the concept of committing suicide or the thought of that action. But what is most fascinating about it the quote is the concept of dreaming if you’re dead. The logic of death according Shakespeare through this play is that death is just a long sleep. With sleep comes dreaming, you might know what you’re going to dream since you witness sounds, images and colors, but you can’t know what you will dream when none of those exist. This really puts a second thought in mind about suicide and is a very philosophical way of looking at the situation, what happens after death?

 

romey q3 shakespear analyisis
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Hamlet: Close Reading

Shakespeare is a very skillful and interesting poet. He puts all of his plays together in a very unique way. How he chooses his style of words and the way he puts them together is incredible. He gives his audiences different perspectives of each of his works and makes them feel every emotion of the characters. One great example of this is in the play “Hamlet” by William Shakespeare, during the soliloquy made by Ophelia in Scene 3 Act 1 lines 163-175. Ophelia was the romantic interest of Hamlet before he started to act “crazy”. In the ball room of the castle they live in, Hamlet just left the room after truly expressing to Ophelia how he feels about her. Ophelia is left alone and she is saddened by what Hamlet has said to her, and starts to reminisce on how he used to be and how he is now. 


Oh, what a noble mind is here o'erthrown!—

The courtier’s, soldier’s, scholar’s, eye, tongue, 

sword,

Th' expectancy and rose of the fair state,

The glass of fashion and the mould of form,

(III.I 163-167) 

Is the first few words Ophelia says in her soliloquy after Hamlet has left the room.  She states that he is not the same as before. His mind has been “o’erthrown” (163) meaning turned around, or taken over by something opposite of what he was before. She then starts to give the reader an idea of how Hamlet was before “The courtier’s, soldier’s, scholar’s, eye, tongue, sword, Th' expectancy and rose of the fair state, The glass of fashion and the mould of form,...” (164-167) She is saying that he was, a great role model, so strong, admirable, a gentleman, with a scholar’s wit. She is confused because he was all of these great and noble things and she does not understand what has happened to him. His whole great and romantic personality has went down the drain.


Th' observed of all observers, quite, quite down!

And I, of ladies most deject and wretched,

That sucked the honey of his music vows,

Now see that noble and most sovereign reason

Like sweet bells jangled, out of tune and harsh;

(III.I 166-172)

Ophelia is continuing to express her feelings towards Hamlet’s “o’erthrown (163)” mind. “Th' observed of all observers, quite, quite down!

And I, of ladies most deject and wretched,” (166-169) She feels like his new attitude has hit her the hardest because they had a romantic connection with each other. She may feel that he has just let that all go and didn’t think about her at all. “That sucked the honey of his music vows, Now see that noble and most sovereign reason...” (170-171) Shakespeare is also a great man of metaphors and similes and many other figure of speeches. This sentence is a great example of a metaphor. Ophelia is comparing Hamlets new attitude to a music note that has lost its happy tune. She continues this thought by saying “Like sweet bells jangled, out of tune and harsh;” (172) The tune now tune is harsh, instead of how it used to be which was sweet. I found it interesting how Shakespeare chose music notes to compare his attitude to. This shows how unpredictable Shakespeare’s plays are, none of his plays are hackneyed and they are all original.

That unmatched form and feature of blown youth

Blasted with ecstasy. Oh, woe is me,

T' have seen what I have seen, see what I see!

(173-175)

She concludes her thoughts by letting the readers know that he is not the same as he was when growing up, it is all ruined by the madness that is inside of him.” That unmatched form and feature of blown youth, Blasted with ecstasy...” She knows that this is not the Hamlet that was raised by the noble family. He has changed greatly and she does not like it. “Oh, woe is me, T' have seen what I have seen, see what I see!...” She is highly affected by his behavior. 


Shakespeare tries to communicate to the audience that she is upset throughout this whole soliloquy because he want to make it as real as possible. Personally, I believe he naturally goes above and beyond in his plays which makes him such a famous and remembered playwright. This soliloquy from Hamlet is a great mixture of Shakespeare’s style. It has emotions 




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A Close Reading of Hamlet


Excerpt from the Play:
Act 3, Scene 1, Lines 63-81


"To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub;
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
Must give us pause: there's the respect
That makes calamity of so long life;
For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely,
The pangs of despised love, the law's delay,
The insolence of office and the spurns
That patient merit of the unworthy takes,
When he himself might his quietus make
With a bare bodkin? who would fardels bear,
To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
But that the dread of something after death,
The undiscover'd country from whose bourn
No traveller returns, puzzles the will
And makes us rather bear those ills we have
Than fly to others that we know not of?"



Analysis:

Time and time again, there are new analyzations, theories, or thoughts that come from the writings of the poet, William Shakespeare. The play Hamlet is no different from all of his other writings of soliloquies, speeches, and ideas. And what makes this play shine out is that the ideas of having multiple meanings to the passages from this one play. A remarkable example of this can be seen in Hamlet’s speech, a soliloquy of Hamlet facing the idea of death or keeping the life of dishonesty that he currently had. In the speech, he talks to himself and compares the value of life and the value of an endless sleep. This part of the play shows another side of Hamlet that Shakespeare is slowly starting to reveal as the play winds down and prepares for the drama of the royal family of Denmark.

            “To die, to sleep;” (Line 63, Act 3, Scene 1) Here, Hamlet is debating life and death. He doesn’t know what to believe due to the fact that the people around him assume that he is crazy and are willing to reiterate to the King and Queen of Denmark every action and conversation Hamlet will have whether it is to directly them or whether it is not. He it would be like he is sleeping off his problems, worries, and ideas.  This one line builds the structure for what Hamlet is trying to portray. He shows that there is much more to death then meets thee eye. In line 64, act 3, scene1, Hamlet says: “To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub;” going more in-depth with the thought of sleeping forever. He wants to highly consider it but then there is a draw back. Readers can see that Hamlet is highly considering the idea of death and peacefulness over his life. While Hamlet is debating on committing suicide or not, he soon realizes that there is a price for dying. The term: “there’s a rub” means that there is a price of death and that is that no one knows what comes after death.

            With that, Hamlet goes into the proposal of death and what the repayment of taking his life really means in the thought of line 65-66: “For in that sleep of death what dreams may come

When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,” As Hamlet says this,  he is slowly changing his mind from considering death to slowly moving back to the perks of living. He previously stated that he wanted to sleep but now states that he does not know what dreams will or will not come true in his never-ending sleep. He doesn’t even know if there is life after death on this earth. A modern day translation of this could be: “If I do die, what will happen to me? Where will I go after death and how will I go on with...anything? That is the only perk to living because I know there will be a tomorrow and I am living for today.”

            And with that, we see the more rational side of Hamlet come back to say: “Must give us pause: there's the respect…that makes calamity of so long life; For who would bear the whips and scorns of time… The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely, The pangs of despised love, the law's delay, The insolence of office and the spurns

That patient merit of the unworthy takes,” (67-73) In regard to these lines, the mindset of Hamlet changes again because of his approach to appreciating life. When looking at all that he has been through, we can see that Hamlet has seen it all: his father’s ghost returning to seek revenge, a crooked king, deceitful friends, and the loss of his love’s heart and honesty.

            As Hamlet goes on to the amount of deceitfulness and negativity coming from his surroundings, he drifts back into a suicidal state of mind and see that maybe: “When he himself might his quietus make…With a bare bodkin? …Who would fardels bear,” (74-75) and that maybe a dagger would do more good than the amount of harm that has already taken place in his life. Now Hamlet is stuck between a rock and a hard place, “To grunt and sweat under a weary life,” (76). Going on, Hamlet sees that death leads to peacefulness “but that the dread of something after death… The undiscover'd country from whose bourn…No traveller returns, puzzles the will…And makes us rather bear those ills we have…Than fly to others that we know not of?” (77-83)

            In the most cautious and unstable state of mind, Hamlet shows that there are three sides to him, one that is afraid of death, one that will avenge his father’s wrongful death, and one that is willing to die for everything to end on his part. With that, readers can see that with the progression of the play there will always be at least one side of these three traits in him.



Here's How I Did a Close Reading of the Play:

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Jalen Smith (Hamlet Close Reading)

Jalen Smith

Analysis Of A Hamlet Quote

Laertes and Ophelia’s Confrontation 

Important Information From Scene: Act 1 Scene 3 page 39-40

Quote:

Think it no more.                                                 

For nature, crescent, does not grow alone 

In thews and (bulk) but, as this temple waxes,

The inward service of the mind and soul

Grows wide withal. Perhaps he loves you now,

And now no soil nor cautel doth demirch

The virtue of his will; but you must fear, 

His greatness weighed, his will is not his own,

(For he himself is subject to his birth.)

He may not, as unvalued persons do,

Carve for himself, for on his choice depends

The safety and the health of this whole state.

And therefore must his choice be circumscribed

Unto the voice and yielding of that body

Whereof he is the head. Then, if he says he loves you,


It fits your wisdom so far to believe it

As he in his particular act and place

May give his saying deed, which is no further

Than the main voice of Denmark goes withal.

Then weigh what loss your honor may sustain

If with too credent ear you list his songs

Or lose your heart or your chaste treasure open

To his unmastered importunity.

Fear it, Ophelia; fear it, my dear sister,

And keep you in the rear of your affection,

Out of the shot and danger of desire.


Analysis:

William Shakespeare, the legendary dramatist, has been recognized for his ability to create such dramatic characters that can lie within every reader. There are many examples listed throughout Shakespeare's most well told stories, one entitled Hamlet. One remarkable example is the deep conversation between both Ophelia and Laertes. The two both discuss the relationship between Ophelia and Hamlet. In the beginning of this scene Laertes is preparing to go away for quite some time. While Laertes is preparing himself, his sister Ophelia enters and they both begin to review everything that has to be done while he is gone. While reviewing Laertes offers additional advice to Ophelia.

The advice that he provided was about Hamlet. Laertes mentions to Ophelia that she should just consider thinking that Hamlet thinks of her as a hot blooded youth and that their relationship won’t last. Laertes thinks that everything is sweet and also believes that Hamlets affections towards her will all fade away very soon. As the reader of this passage it actually seems as though even though Ophelia and Hamlet are both deeply in love and they would like to be together Laertes is trying to do everything in his power to try and stop their thriving relationship. When the reader analyzes the tensions between what Laertes is thinking about Hamlet and what Ophelia is thinking about Hamlet it turns out to be completely different.  It seems as though Laertes kind of shows some type of hatred towards Hamlet. 

As Laertes starts talking to Ophelia he mentions some very important things which help reveal his actual concern for Ophelia. He say’s “For nature, crescent, does not grow alone In thews and (bulk) but, as the temple waxes, The inward service of the mind and soul Grows wide withal.” Through this quote Laertes is suggesting that Hamlet not only gets bigger in his body but his responsibilities have to grow also. This quote seemed to be very challenging but I had to really dig deep and take my time to try and understand exactly what he was talking about. In the next sentence Laertes says, “Perhaps he loves you now, And now no soil nor cautel doth demirch The virtue of his will; but you must fear, His greatness weighed, his will is not his own, (For he himself is subject to his birth.)” Laertes is trying to encourage the situation in someway by stating Hamlets love for Ophelia however he believes that she has to become cautious of his actions towards her. He then says that she must remember that he belongs to a family of high authority and his intentions don’t really matter that much at all. 

After making that clear Laertes then mentions, “He may not, as unvalued persons do, Carve himself, for on his choice depends The safety and the health of this whole state. And Therefore must his choice be circumscribed Uno the voice and yielding of that body Whereof he is the head.” This quote stood out to me because Laertes is saying to Ophelia that Hamlet can’t really make personal choices for himself because the country depends on what he does as a person. The choices that he makes for himself have to agree with the whole nation of Denmark. This situation is thoroughly indicated in some cases. He goes on and says, “It fits your wisdom so far to believe it As he in his particular act and place May give his saying deed, which is no further Than the main voice of Denmark goes withal.” Laertes is basically saying that if Hamlet loves Ophelia, she should be wise enough to see that his words only mean as much as the state of Denmark allows them to mean. This quote was very interesting.

Then he says, “Then weigh what loss your honor may sustain If with loss your honor may sustain If with too credent ear you list his songs, Or lose your heart, or your chaste treasure open To his unmastered importunity.” Ophelia in this case should think about how shameful it would be for her to fall for his flirtatious conversations and should surrender her treasure to his importunity. One of the last important quotes that Laertes said to Ophelia was, “Fear it, Ophelia; fear it, my dear sister, And keep you in the rear of your affection, Out of the shot and danger of desire.” From this quote Laertes is warning Ophelia about Hamlet’s ways and that she should keep her love under control for him. Laertes says that she shouldn’t become apart of his own desire. 

To conclude everything this work of Shakespeare goes to show that he is very creative with showing the audience how dramatic character can really lie within every reader.

Hamlet Analysis Slide Show
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Hamlet Analysis




Hawk-eyed vigilance is required to see the hidden meaning in many of Shakespeare’s works. Quite often, we are not exactly up to the task.  His writing itself, besides portraying a thrilling tale, is filled with puzzles and brain teasers meant to enthrall the mind. The plethora of symbolism captures the mindset of each and every character. An exceptional example of this, is the costume changes that occur in Hamlet. Hamlet, the main character, sinks into a deep ocean of grief and depression. He grieves for his father’s death, and on top of that he takes on the grief that his mother could never show decently. All of the anguish that he experiences overtime is shown with his attire.

'”Tis not alone my inky cloak, good mother,
Nor customary suits of solemn black,
Nor windy suspiration of forced breath,
No, nor the fruitful river in the eye,
Nor the dejected 'havior of the visage,
Together with all forms, moods, shapes of grief,
That can denote me truly” (1.2.4)
Hamlet indicates that his clothes are “denoting” his spoiled feelings. Hamlet explains how “suits of solemn black” cannot  express the intensity of the suffering that lives within him. As grief is portrayed through the color black, Hamlet’s attire suggests that he has been upset for quite a while.  As he continues to grieve, Hamlet’s mother on the other hand hastily re-marries and seemingly forgets her grief in a short amount of time. Because his Mother, Gertrude, decides to close her black attire and move on, so must her surroundings. Everyone in the kingdom condones her decision and acts cheerful about her new marriage. Their attires show acceptance, but Hamlet's does not. Just as he is the only person wearing black, he is also the only one grieving in a gleeful, jaunty, court.

Moreover, as his mother is preoccupied with her new husband, and the happiness that comes with the marriage, one woman gives Hamlet more care than his mother has shown throughout the story. This woman happens to be in the happy crowd, and she is upset to see Hamlet’s evident heartache. As she expresses her distress, she is shown to be the only woman to genuinely care about Hamlet:

My lord, as I was sewing in my closet,
Lord Hamlet, with his doublet all unbraced;
No hat upon his head; his stockings foul'd,
Ungarter'd, and down-gyved to his ancle;
Pale as his shirt; his knees knocking each other;
And with a look so piteous in purport
As if he had been loosed out of hell
To speak of horrors,--he comes before me.” (2.1.1)
This woman, Ophelia, is convinced that Hamlet has gone mad. Her conclusion is supported by his attire. The state of someone’s clothes often reflect a person’s mental well-being, and Ophelia notices that Hamlet is not wearing his usual black cloak when she says, "pale as his shirt." Furthermore, his facial expression appears to look as tortured and drained as a dead man’s. Ophelia has come to a conclusion that Hamlet altogether looks as eerie like a ghost.  Moreover, Hamlet appears to have lost his faith in human nature altogether.        

Hamlet firmly believes that all of his troubles are caused by his mother, "Frailty, thy name is woman!" (1.2.6), and as a result, he insults the humanity of women as an "unweeded garden” that is "rank and gross in nature" (1.2.6). Hamlet continues to refer to women with a noticeable stigma, explaining how the nature of  women repels him. He sees his mother as as a female representing all other women in the world. That is why he classifies a woman's nature with such disgust. As the main woman in his life has deceived Hamlet, he has come to the conclusion that women are evil and useless. Meanwhile, Ophelia, who cares for him, is too late to repair the trust in the gender, so ruined by his mother.    

Ultimately, Hamlet is one out of many complex art pieces that Shakespeare has written. Shakespeare ever so cleverly displays the hidden meanings in his characters through little details; As Shakespeare tells the story of Hamlet’s life, he indicates the mental state and emotions that Hamlet experiences through attire. The Brilliance that Shakespeare uses within subtle attributes are a lot of the time overlooked. Nevertheless in all cases, they are greatly important to the value of the greater meanings behind what he displayed.
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Ananda Knight (Hamlet Close reading) Act 1 scene 5

Hamlet Analysis Act 1 Scene 5

Ananda Knight


I am thy father's spirit,

Doom'd for a certain term to walk the night,

And for the day confined to fast in fires,

Till the foul crimes done in my days of nature

Are burnt and purged away. But that I am forbid

To tell the secrets of my prison-house,

I could a tale unfold whose lightest word

Would harrow up thy soul, freeze thy young blood,

Make thy two eyes, like stars, start from their spheres,


Hamlet is written in old english and has its ways of presenting words and lines in which people today may have a hard time understanding. Even though the text may be a little hard to read the way in which Shakespeare is written makes it both interesting, and a learning experience. 

The Hamlet scene that I found really interesting was Act 1 Scene 5. In this scene/ act Hamlet is introduced to the ghost of his father. His father’s ghost comes to him one night. When he first opens up to Hamlet he tells him how he has sinned and his should has yet to enter the gates of heaven because of his many untold sins. Even though the ghost of Hamlets father comes to him and presents himself and tells him that he cant go to heaven until he is punished for his sins he still refuses to tell his son what the sins are exactly for his is forbid to tell them. 


When reading this at first I expected Hamlet and his fathers first words to be different. I thought that Hamlet and his father may have exchanged words like I miss you, how are you ect. 

I also expected Hamlet to seem a little scared or hesitant as to how his father is appearing to him and why he can see a ghost. One question I had was did Hamlet notice that the ghost was his father even before he came out and said I am thy fathers spirit. Another question I had was what were all of the sins that the ghost had been talking about.


When I think of a king I think of a good person someone who people come to for help, guidance, and leadership. As I read this scene I wonder what kind of sins could a king have against him keeping him from his entrance into heaven. This scene is powerful because not only does it show a relationship between Hamlet and his father but It leaves readers wondering and mind boggled. Readers will be left wondering because the ghost constantly reminds the readers about how his are to horrible to be told and that he is forbid to tell them. But why? What are they? what did he do? Why can he talk to his own son about it? These are all questions that went through my mind while reading the scene. This scene includes an excerpt that makes me to continue to read the book and hope that soon my questions are answered.


This scene has a good way of telling us about the ghost’s past. was Hamlets father really a bad person or a criminal. Is there a reason why the author held back the sins in which he committed and why did he describe them as being so traitorous. I feel like this scene covered a lot with a few lines.


 

Hamlet Prezi
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Hamlet Close Reading

Hamlet Ghost Analysis

Hamlet, or The Tragedy of Hamlet: Prince of Denmark is a play written by William Shakespeare back in the later-1500s.  Out of all of the plays and acts that were written and directed by William Shakespeare, Hamlet has been one of Shakespeare’s best and most highly acclaimed play he ever created. Also, other than it being his most highly acclaimed play, it’s also his lengthiest player ever written. Hamlet came in with a total word count of 29,551, covering an extensively long amount of 4,402 lines. Further on, we will go into and present the scene that is to be analyzed.


The following scene takes place in Act 1, Scene 5 on lines 14 through 29, the position being played is the Ghost of Hamlet’s father, Claudius:

I am thy father’s spirit,
Doomed for a certain term to walk the night
And for the day confined to fast in fires
Till the foul crimes done in my days of nature
Are burnt and purged away but that I am forbid
To tell the secrets of my prison house,
I could a tale unfold whose lightest word
Would hallow up thy soul, freeze thy young blood,
Make the two eyes, like stars, start from their spheres
thy knotted and combinéd locks to part
And each particular hair to stand an end,
Like quills upon the fearful porpentine.
But this eternal blazon must not be
To ears of flesh and blood. List, list, O list!
If though didst ever thy dear father love–

Starting off from the beginning of this scene, this is when the ghost comes out to Hamlet, proposing the fact that he is the ghost of Hamlet’s father, who was killed by Claudius. Pause, let’s take a few steps... well, a few scene-steps back. Back in Act 1 Scene 1, in the beginning of Hamlet, the two watchmen Bernardo and Marcellus are watching over the castle as they begin to realize that a strange apparition was appearing in the darkness. They almost immediately thought that the ghost was the ghost of dead King Hamlet. After noticing that shakespeare inputted those various appearance of the ghost into the play, a few questions came rolling through my head. First a foremost, I pondered why Shakespeare thought it was necessary to make the ghost come into play a few times before even encountering itself to Hamlet. Personally, I thought this was Shakespeare’s monotonic and indirect way of hinting to the readers that the ghost was certainly Hamlet’s father. Using this method of writing, Shakespeare was able to successfully capture the readers attention, throw the reader off, while also hinting towards the reader what could possibly happen, such as Hamlet eventually coming around to confront the ghost.

Continuing onto this line from the soliloquy:

“Till the foul crimes done in my days of nature

Are burnt and purged away...”


These lines are somewhat towards the beginning of the soliloquy. At this point, Hamlet’s father’s ghost is explaining that he wants everything that caused his dead to be gone from the face of the earth. William Shakespeare added this part because it’s there to explain the father’s infuriation from being dead and no longer having the ability to roam the Earth a free human being.


Dead King Hamlet goes on to say...


“I could a tale unfold whose lightest word

Would hallow up thy soul, freeze thy young blood,

Make the two eyes, like stars, start from their spheres...–”


From here, the ghost is explaining that there are things on the dead side of the world that are not meant to be seen. From here, Hamlet is very curious to hear what is father has to say about being dead, but the ghost begins to explain that if he did begin to extrapolate the truth, Hamlet may not be able to bare listening to the rest, considering how frightening and inhumane it is.

All of that could also be connected with...
“–...Thy knotted and combinéd locks to part

And each particular hair to stand an end,

Like quills upon the fearful porpentine.”


These lines are just a continuation from what the ghost was just explaining, how the dead world is too exhilarating to listen to.


In conclusion, this main quote from Act 1, Scene 5 mainly summarizes the debut of Hamlet and his fathers reconnection as Shakespeare includes various types of tone and “secret messages” that depict the possibilities of different reasons why the ghosts various appearances occurred early on in the play.





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Hamlet Close Reading

There are many ways this could be analyzed. In the beginning It is being stated as if he is waiting on a decision. There is a lot to be waiting for by allowing time to go past means that time is being wasted. The more he focuses on what the Objective which means that he is able to conquer more than he would have. He knows for a fact that he is not going crazy he is being sure that all is for the right and the more he does wrong the longer it will take for such a job to be done. He believes that he may not being making sense in his own mind. In order to test that theory he must talk to him self which may seem worst but it seems that by doing it that way he gets what he has to say out and un noticed so it won’t draw to much attention to himself. That is the last thing he wants to do at the moment

Further on in the scene he explains that it is reserved for a quantity of choice, this means that it is up to him either he will follow through with the plan and succeed or he will not. When that much pressure is put on someone it makes them feel a totally different way so that they will ensure that all the fear is shook out of them. Attempting not to have time so that he can continue his long talk to his self before the big finally. The reason why I am calling it a finally is because there are more to the situation then we may think. In order for it to be a finally it means that this could actually be the end, so when you count your footsteps and wait for the perfect you know that the chance of you actually messing up are little to none.

He mentions that the devil is what may be holding him back or what could possibly be interfering with all he has to do. He does not want to believe what has been done to his father but time has quickly caught up and he know the time is near that there must not be anymore things that stand in his way but it seems that he is going numb from all this dram he says “Eyes without feeling, feeling without sight”. To me he is stating that he has no sense of direction he has no where to go with this all he knows is what he has to do to avenge. As we all still know he has to wait for the perfect time.

He is now trying to make sure that he toughens and realize that this is reality everything that he does from now on matters, and counts. There will be no sadness only justice to prove something. He still cannot believe what he has seen but he know after the lies and the wrongfulness that this may be the only wait out the situation that he is in. No one want to be stuck with a conscious in your head nagging you to do something definitely not if a ghost told you. When someone asks why you did what do you say do you say a ghost did it or do you hold it to your own state of mind and say you had a feeling. You were sure 100% by a feeling that he has killed your father and if thou may be wrong it may not end well. Who know if this is true but of course there is only one way to find out.

Hamlet Presentation
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Deep reading of "Hamlet By: William Shakespeare"

The best playwright in history is William Shakespeare. Shakespeare stories always seem to include death, life, sadness, madness, etc. making all the emotion shine out through his books. It’s hard to understand the real meaning behind what William Shakespeare writes. Not only do the words make it hard to understand but the emotion in every scene that help make people think of why someone would act a certain way. Since Shakespeare put so much emotion and feeling into his books, his words hide the deep meanings that are actually behind them. One play that represents this is one of Shakespeare's most famous play, Hamlet. This play is know to be one of his best play, but also know to be the one with the worst/best conflicts out of all of his writings.

A scene that had a great impact in the story is when hamlet is talking to himself about a player that had come to his house. Hamlet wasn’t getting why this player was crying like when he had said, “What's Hecuba to him, or he to Hecuba, That he should weep for her?” (I.ii). Hamlet questioned the reason that the player had for cried because the player had never met the woman. Just like the woman had never met the player. He was think deeply into the fact that this man cried. He was thinking about his own self at that time to. Thinking about the unjust that had happen to his beloved father. The unjust that only he knows of and that he can’t let go of. So much pain that curses his existence.

“What would he do, Had he the motive and the cue for passion That I have?”(I.ii).The player weeped for Hecuba so then the player would definitely cry for the lost of a great king, also known as Hamlet’s father. “He would drown the stage with tears And cleave the general ear with horrid speech, Make mad the guilty and appal the free, Confound the ignorant, and amaze indeed The very faculties of eyes and ears.”(lines 587-591). Hamlet is thinking of a plan that involves the players. By doing this he plans to lure out the suspected criminal that killed his father.

He wasn't sure on whether or not to trust the ghost so he set up the play to see the reactions of claudius. He wanted to make sure that his uncle was actually guilty of killing King Hamlet. He felt that he was the worst person in the world. Hamlet blames himself for the death of his father. Since Hamlet's father is gone he feel like he can relate to the play that he asked the player to perform for him. “Yet I, A dull and muddy-mettled rascal, peak, Like John-a-dreams, unpregnant of my cause, And can say nothing; no, not for a king, Upon whose property and most dear life A damn'd defeat was made. Am I a coward? Who calls me villain? breaks my pate across? Plucks off my beard, and blows it in my face? Tweaks me by the nose? gives me the lie i' the throat, As deep as to the lungs? who does me this?”(I.ii) Hamlet has a lot of questions that he would like to get answers to that’s why he is planning this play out.


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Hamlet Close Reading

Act 2, Scene 2, Lines # 606 - 615
I should have fatted all the region kites
With this slave's offal: bloody, bawdy villain!
Remorseless, treacherous, lecherous, kindless villain!
O, vengeance!
Why, what an ass am I! This is most brave,
That I, the son of a dear father murder'd,
Prompted to my revenge by heaven and hell,
Must, like a whore, unpack my heart with words,
And fall a-cursing, like a very drab,
A scullion! Fie upon't! foh!

Analysis
If there is one thing that William Shakespeare does well within plays like Hamlet, it is to give the character a beautiful, dramatic monologue. It is way for readers to understand the character. However, due to our “ascended” language, readers and listeners today would not be able to understand scenes of a character who is alone in scene and speaks out his internal thoughts. The character would be considered to be crazy, expressing such drama and language. With good analyzation of the wording, a reader can understand the scene... as long as the reader dedicates his or her time to analyze the words.

I’m taking Act 2, Scene 2, and lines # 606 - 615 from Hamlet. This is a scene where Hamlet is in his room. He blurts out his feelings of his uncle who is now the King, and who is to be one and only suspect who killed the previous king, his father. To read the book for the first time (or see the movie for the first time), I had no idea what they were saying with the fancy English back in their day. Given time, lines can mean the simplest of things.

Lines such as “I should have fatted all the region kites; With this slave's offal: bloody, bawdy villain! Remorseless, treacherous, lecherous, kindless villain! O, vengeance!” (Lines # 606 - 609) To clarify what kites are, it is not the toy. Kites are birds that eat insects and small mammals.  To clarify another thing, offal is the internal organs of animal being eaten. There is the connection between kites and offals. Hamlet imagines the pain he wants to give his uncle. He describes his uncle as a villain plus a few other things, and given the situation, he’s right. His uncle committed regicide. This is treachery. His uncle immediately married his mother after the king’s death. This lecherous. The way he pulled off the crime by pouring poison in his ear, and leaving him. This is remorseless and kindless. It is amazing how one word in a line can mean so much. I don’t blame Hamlet for seeking vengeance. I would have the same feeling. No one gets away with regicide, not even if the victim is family.

This is probably a set of lines that could be understandable, but may still have confusion. “Why, what an ass am I! This is most brave, That I, the son of a dear father murder'd, Prompted to my revenge by heaven and hell,” (Lines # 610 - 612) Hamlet notices himself acting wildly about this, and he is embarrassed (even though no one is around him). Yet, he recognizes he is better than this. He is after all the son of the previous king, he is a prince (or lord). He should be less unstable about this, but he can’t because the one person he looked up to is dead, his mother married the traitorous uncle, so he can’t really look up to her now. He is a lone wolf. Even so, he feels his pride rise once he realize he is destined to avenge his father death, and if no one can help, he must do it himself. That’s what makes it difficult for him. Once again, words that mean so much more than they let on.

These lines required more time for analysis. “Must, like a whore, unpack my heart with words, And fall a-cursing, like a very drab, A scullion! Fie upon't! foh!” (Lines # 613 - 615) Now, Hamlet self-pities himself by saying he shouting outbursts of his rage and that he isn’t doing anything that is benefiting him. To clarify, a scullion is a kitchen servant who doesn’t need skill to his or her job done. He’s saying he can’t do much with screaming and fooling around. He knows something must be done, what he was doing a few moments ago isn’t going to get him anywhere. It normally wouldn’t for anyone in that matter.

There we have it. One section of a scene analyzed and explained. If readers/writers are given the time, they can understand Shakespeare. More specifically, the monologues the character such as Hamlet express. It's what makes the monologues unique. Their ability to tell more than what we see.


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Taylor Veasley's Hamlet Annotation

Hamlet Annotation

Taylor Veasley

Water Stream

March 1, 2013


William Shakespeare was a man of complex thoughts and language, this makes his work a challenge to dissect and to analyze. Shakespeare’s Hamlet is recognized as an especially difficult piece of writing in literature because of the extensive vocabulary and the difficult story plots. The main character of Hamlet is a young man who loses his father and the story focuses on him avenging his father’s death. In this paper an excerpt from Hamlet will be dissected and analyzed. The excerpt that is going to be used was taken from Act 1 Scene 5, and was spoken by the Ghost of the King and spans from Line 9 to Line 24.


“I am thy father’s spirit.”(Act 1, Scene 5 Line 9)The very first line of this speech sets the entire piece up, it is a simple statement yet it is very powerful. Before this encounter the ghost never verified that he was the spirit of Hamlet’s father. So when he followed the first line with saying that he is walks on the earth at night and is confined to hell during the day. “Doomed for a certain term to walk the night And for the day confined to fast in fires,” (Act 1 Scene 5 Lines 10&11). I found it interesting and unexpected that the spirit was in hell considering how he was portrayed in the book leading up to this. Throughout the book whenever the King was mentioned he was spoken about as an honest and kind man so the sins that he speaks of were surprising. I also find it odd that after mentioning these sins Shakespeare never actually specifies what the sins were.

The ghost then goes on to say that he is sentenced to hell until his sins that he committed while he was alive have gone away, but that he is forbidden to tell why he is sentenced. “Till the foul crimes done in my days of nature Are burnt and purged away. But that I am forbid To tell the secrets of my prison house,” (Act 1 Scene 5 Lines 12-14) Again, I feel as though Shakespeare not bringing up the reasons for the King to be in Hell was an odd but seemingly intentional aspect. I believe that the reasons were left out because of the image that has been painted for us of the King. We see the King as a wonderful man and ruler and if Shakespeare were to change that perception of this character it could conflict with prerequisite ideas about this character.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
The way Shakespeare has the ghost describe what will happen to humans if they hear of the horrible tales of the underworld is captivating. Shakespeare uses very descriptive similes when the ghost is describing what will happen to Hamlet if he tells him of the forbidden sins that explain why he is sentenced to hell. “Make thy two eyes, like stars, start from their spheres, Thy knotted and combinèd locks to part. And each particular hair to stand on end, Like quills upon the fearful porpentine.” ( Act 1 Scene 5 Lines 18-21) He compares Hamlet’s hair to that of a porcupine’s quills and his eyes to stars, both comparisons paint clear pictures of the reaction. After all of the description of all of the horrid side effects to what the spirit is about to tell him, the spirit says that if he loves his father then he will listen. “List, list, O, list! If thou didst ever thy dear father love—” ( Act 1 Scene 5 Lines 23-24) I saw this line as a sort of foreshadowing for what he was about to tell Hamlet. When the spirit said if you ever love your father it made me think that he was going to tell him of how he died. Following the speech that is being analyzed is another speech where the spirit tells of how he died.

Shakespeare’s language throughout this text is exciting. He plays with his words and plays with contrasts and comparisons of objects to body parts. All sixteen lines feature an important aspect of this speech. Because the speech is an opening to another piece of writing Shakespeare does a superb job on setting up the stage for the next piece to come along.
Hamlet Annotation PDF
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