How to Lie With Statistics - Full Compilation

This is a compilation of a 3-podcast series that dissects the novel, "How To Lie With Statistics" by Darrell Huff. The book itself explores the various ways that statistics are altered and used outright incorrectly to project a certain image, convey a certain feeling, or produce a certain outcome within the masses. 
In this series, Stephanie Dyson, Dillon Hersey, Maggie Clampet-Lundquist and Sean Morris look into the various themes that comprise the book and dissect what this means, not only for their high school stats class, but for the world around them.

As promised, here is a compilation of all three podcasts in our mini-series. Enjoy!

Music is provided for free by Donnie Trumpet & The Social Experiment's debut album, "Surf", which dropped May 2015.

How to Lie With Statistics Pt. 3 (Finale)

This is podcast 3 of a 3-podcast series that dissects the novel, "How To Lie With Statistics" by Darrell Huff. The book itself explores the various ways that statistics are altered and used outright incorrectly to project a certain image, convey a certain feeling, or produce a certain outcome within the masses. 
In this series, Stephanie Dyson, Dillon Hersey, Maggie Clampet-Lundquist and Sean Morris look into the various themes that comprise the book and dissect what this means, not only for their high school stats class, but for the world around them.


In this podcast: 
We looked at Chapters 8-10, closing out the book and the project with out final thoughts on the novel. We also took the chance to connect some of our knowledge gained from HtLwS to other classes that we're taking. Overall, we found the project as a whole to be our favorite math benchmark to date (because we did so little math, but learned so much more than we intended) and were pleased with the ending. Now, it's time to apply all of this knowledge to the real world. 
In the meantime, we hope you enjoyed our podcasts. Look at the next blog post for a compilation of all three!

Music is provided for free by Donnie Trumpet & The Social Experiment's debut album, "Surf", which dropped May 2015.

How to Lie With Statistics podcast 2

Podcast 2- 3,4,5 and 6 - 6:3:16, 9.31 PM
People: Tamira and Angelica
We discussed chapters 3,4,5 and 6. In chapter 3, we discussed the cavities lower with the doakes toothpaste and the tests they did with the pennies. For chapter 4, we discussed about peter and linda different IQ scores and how they think if they have a higher IQ, they are smaller but if it is lower they are retarded. We also discussed the different sampling methods and their outlooks on that. For chapter 5, we talked about the gee wiz graph and the way it is drawn and what it means. For chapter 6, we discussed the pictoral chart. 

How we discussed them was by summarizing each chapter and then picking out what we think was the most important points or just certain things we liked in the chapter. We didn't have any conflicts during the piece and also did not have any questions either. 

Final Podcast, Imani and Amirah

This podcast is about the chapters 7-10. In these final chapters we did the same thing for all of the others which is observe. This conversation was about all of the key things that were said in each chapter. We asked questions and even answered some of our own questions. There was some confusion with what the book was saying but then it was cleared up. 
3rd podcast - 6:3:16, 4.18 PM

Podcast #3 - Ilker, Jamie & Brian

In our final podcast, Brian, Jamie and I talked about chapters 7,8,9 and 10.  In these chapters, we do a lot of connecting.  Everything can be connected back to previous chapters.  Chapter 10 answers many of the questions that we had when we first started the book.  Chapters 7 & 8 talked about other statistical lies.  Chapter 9 basically summed up all of the lies and explained how to lie with statistics.  Chapter 10 was telling us how to find statistical lies so we do not fall for the statistical lies we read about in the book. 

3rd & Final Podcast-How to Lie with Statistics- Tiarra & Lindsey

Hello & Goodbye! It's us Lindsey and Tiarra back with our third and final podcast. In this recording, we cover chapters 8,9 and 10 and then have a goodbye discussion and even discuss the introduction at some point. The format of our discussions are formed around discussing the chapter and what it was about itself, analyzing it, and then having a discussion/question period. We agreed with each other for the most part.It was a great experience and we loved working together and talking about the book.

Thank you!

Here is the 3rd podcast:

chapters8to10HTLWS
Here is the FULL podcast from chapter 1-chapter 10


FULLHTLWSpodcast

Second podcast, Imani and Amirah

Podcast number 2 - 6:3:16, 3.37 PM
This second podcast is from chapter 3-6. We figured they were pretty much the same, so we combined them into one podcast. We talked about how some of the things talked about in the book relates to us to a certain extent. We made observation about things in class that we talked about already in regards to this book. 

Full Podcast for "How to Lie with Statics"

This is the group's final podcast. Every member of the group (Sattera, Nashay, Amanda, and Adowa) spoke throughout the entire podcast. We all enjoyed reading the book and working together for our final benchmark of the year. The book taught us all plenty of valuable information that we will be able to apply to our own lives. As we were reading chapters seven through eleven we talked about many tricks and deceptions that people use through statics. One of those topics were semi-attached figures. That was about how people use figures that seem alike to trick people into thinking that they're the same thing. For example, in the book they said that nostrum cures colds because it killed 31,108 germs in a test tube. People unknowingly thought that since it killed so many germs in a test tube that it would be able to kill germs inside of humans. However test tube germs and human germs are two completely different. Another thing we talked about was the "before and after affect". Advertisements tend to use before and after pictures to prove how well their product works. However, they use different lightings and filters to make items seem better. I hope you enjoyed all our podcast. Thanks for listening.  
Final Stats Podcast

FULL PODCAST for: "How To Lie With Statistics"

This is our final podcast that is a combination of all four of our podcasts, that is 42 minutes long!

For this podcast, we mainly focused on what the book was trying to portray to us through the authors confusing writing, the illustrations, etc. 
Our shortest podcast was the one about the Introduction, where we discussed what we thought the book was going to be talking about, and what was going to happen.
In our first "official" podcast, we focused on chapters 1 and 2. We mainly pointed out what we read about collecting data sets and how we go about them. We talked about examples used in the book about choosing samples, being bias, collecting data, and other statistical things. For the most part, what we were reading was familiar to us because we just learned about the things talked about in class. 
In the second podcast we talked about advertisements, coin flips, IQ's, and how we interpreted different illustrations in the chapters. We compared what we read to the things we learned in class. One spefic thing was the coin flips. When we learned about coin flips, we thought it would always be 50/50 when flipping, but that wasn't correct. 
In our last podcast, we focused on the rest of the book (to chapter 10). We mainly focused on the titles of the book, and how they correlated to the writing. We also talked about the "bigger picture" which was, what we each thought it meant what the author meant by "How to lie with Statistics". 


Speakers: Isabella Blackwell, Jada Terrell, and Kadija Koita 

LGMD

Science
Limb Girdle Muscular dystrophy affects one shoulder and hips. It makes those area weaker. The disease is a genetic one with over 30 variations. There are some dominant genes and receive genes. This means that people with the genes can pass them on to their offspring. It makes it very hard to walk and complete simple task. Many people are bound to wheelchairs.

Society

There are Genetic screening one can do to see if they have it. Another hing is that if one has trouble standing on the tip of their toes they should maybe ask  doctor.

Self

My grandpa has ALS another type of muscle disease.
Also I learned and thought about LGMD for a scholarship.
Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy
This is a genetic disease
  • Caused by mutations on various genes

  • This leads to over 30 variations of LGMD

  • Very prominent in family with a dominant LGMD gene

  • If a parent has a dominant gene there is a 50% chance it will spread to the children

  • This is a genetic disease

  • Caused by mutations on various genes

  • This leads to over 30 variations of LGMD

  • Very prominent in family with a dominant LGMD gene

  • If a parent has a dominant gene there is a 50% chance it will spread to the children



https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1FzW8nGwlxYkchb8vbVa2bRL_c9ACdBsgLnklGOBiw4Y/edit#slide=id.g111d3b436f_0_0

Podcast #3

Speakers: Isabella Blackwell, Jada Terrell, and Kadija Koita

We were speaking on the last 4 chapters of the book. We were basically trying to understand the meaning of the title. What we each thought it meant what the author meant by "How to lie with Statistics". One thing we all thought was very interesting to talk about was the use of statistics in media and public broadcasting. 

Enjoy!
podcast 3

Podcast 3 // Bella, Andrew, Kristina, Kevin

All of our group members were present for this podcast. We talked about the last 2 chapters of the book, 9 and 10. Chapter 9 was basically like a summary of all the methods people use to lie with stats. Chapter 10 was a summary of how to point out these lies and what questions to ask. Our plan was the same with writing everything out than recording. We didn't have any conflicts or questions. 
Stats podcast 3

Final Podcast : Joie, Espi, Sydne and Cameron

​The Final podcast consist of the discussion of the entire book. We also included the discussion of the entire book. For the majority of this book we had similar response to the text. This was a very to listen to studies, that in many cases to our life circumstances. 

During first podcast we discussed chapter's 1-3. We discussed the topics from each chapter and related them back to real life situations. Esperanza also read out some discussion questions that she came up with herself while she did her reading which allowed us to get other different opinions and commonalities that we shared while reading on our own as well. It was very easy to have a conversation with 4 people because there was more opinions involved and ideas that were shared. Having a nice lay out of the conversation also helps because there's very few pausing moments which makes the podcast a much richer material. 

​Our group discussed the chapters 4-7, for the second podcast. During these chapters we got a first hand look on the saying "How To Lie with Statistics". We learned that it is all about showing what you want and not showing all of your collected data. In chapter 5, it was quoted,"there is terror behind numbers." The point we got from that was that you can cut a graph off and withhold certain data to the audience at any point and it wouldn't be considered as changing the data, but showing what we want. 

​Our third podcast consist of us speaking about chapter 8-10. We spoke on our final opinions on the book. We tried to relate what we learned in the final chapter to what we learned in previous stats classes.



Super Freakonomics Full Podcast - Ava Olsen and Michelle Friedman

We have compiled all of our podcasts into one large audio file; link located below. (The audio file may be too big to simply play in Google Drive - The file must be downloaded.)

Our first installment of our Superfreakonomics podcast series was intended to get more in depth into the extremely interesting topics that this book has to offer. The introduction segment summarizes and discusses the introduction of the book. This prologue chapter (introduction to the book) highlighted a plethora of issues involving statistics and a necessity for a deep understanding of math and how these situations relate to it. Each subject/category that was introduced is pretty much completely unrelated, but each is tied together with statistical comparisons and economics that make the topics alluring and hard to believe. We examined many of the key stories that we think were important to take apart and really understand. Our intended audience should be interested in math and how it relates to things happening over time and what they mean for the populations that are involved.

In the second installment of our podcast series about Superfreakonomics we discussed the first chapter, How Is a Street Prostitute Like a Department-Store Santa?, and the second chapter, Why Should Suicide Bombers Buy Life Insurance?. Though the two chapters covered a plethora of questions, studies, and data, we chose to discuss only a few of the topics that were the most interesting to us. We talked about the significant wage gap between equally qualified, professional men and women. Then, we investigated the critical emergency room procedures that make for the best and worst patient outcomes. Chapter two also showed us that doctor review criteria can be extremely flawed and ought to be taken with a grain of sand when choosing your doctor. Overall, these two chapters showed us a lot of new numbers on interesting subjects and we’ve learned to always investigate the nuances that can affect data results.

The third podcast in the Superfreakonomics series highlights some questions from our teacher, Mr. Miles. He had a few specific questions about prostitution law enforcement and terrorism prediction and prevention. Then we moved on to the third chapter and discussed crime rates and altruism. We challenged the legitimacy of the correlation between TV viewing and increased crime rates. We also debated the idea of true altruism and how incentives and fear play into all of our decisions. Next week we will most likely finish off the book with chapters four and five and answer more listener questions if there are any.

In the fourth and final segment of our Superfreakonomics series, we responded to a listener question about organ donor compensation, discussed the outcomes of cheap and simple fixes in chapter four, The Fix Is In, and it's Cheap and Simple, and debated the clarity and significance of topics and arguments from chapter five What do Al Gore and Mount Pinatubo Have in Common? We agreed that though there were many contradictions and confusing lines of evidence throughout the entire book, the lesson to be learned is that we ought to take all new data with a bit of healthy skepticism and always deeply examine our data to understand the underlying misconceptions or misrepresentations.


Click here for the full one hour podcast!

 

Super Freakonomics Podcast Part 4 (FINAL) - Ava Olsen and Michelle Friedman

In the fourth and final segment of our Superfreakonomics series, we responded to a listener question about organ donor compensation, discussed the outcomes of cheap and simple fixes in chapter four, The Fix Is In, and it's Cheap and Simple, and debated the clarity and significance of topics and arguments from chapter five What do Al Gore and Mount Pinatubo Have in Common? We agreed that though there were many contradictions and confusing lines of evidence throughout the entire book, the lesson to be learned is that we ought to take all new data with a bit of healthy skepticism and always deeply examine our data to understand the underlying misconceptions or misrepresentations.


*(The audio file may be too big to simply play in Google Drive - The file must be downloaded.)

HAIR

Hair is a strand of protein that grows from the follicles in the skin. It is composed of the tough protein called keratin. Each strand of hair is held into the skin by a follicle which is inside of the skin. At the base of the stand is a bulb that lives inside of the follicle. In the bulb of the hair strand, cells divide and grow to build the hair shaft inside of the hair. Blood vessels also bring nourishment to the cells in the bulb and they bring hormones that determine growth and the structure of the hair.
2000px-Hair_follicle-en.svg
2000px-Hair_follicle-en.svg
Hair grows in 3 distinct stages: Anagen, Catagen, and Telogen.  Anagen is known as the growing phase when hair is growing. It usually lasts 2-7 years & determines the length of your hair. Catagen is known as the regression phase. It’s when the hair shrinks and detaches from the hair follicle. It usually lasts for about 10 days. The last stage is telogen, which is the resting phase. This is when the hair is released and falls out, then the follicle remains inactive for 3 months. This stage usually lasts for about 3 months.
Hair-Growth-Cycle-White
Hair-Growth-Cycle-White

When hair is pushed up through the hair follicle and towards the surface of your scalp, the cells fill with fibrous proteins and lose their nucleus. When it reaches the surface, it’s a complex system of protein-rich fibers. This is known as Keratinization.

Society classifies hair into different categories. It’s called the hair typing system. People with Type 1 hair have straight, fine hair, that tends to be oily, and is hard to damage. People with Type 2 hair have wavy hair in a ‘S’ pattern. People with Type 3 hair have curly hair that can range from being in a ‘S’ pattern to kink or tight curls with a lot of strands of hair densely packed together. People with Type 4 hair have very tightly coiled hair that is very fragile and has less defined curls. There are certainly trends in different hair styles.


4609712199
4609712199
hair-typing-chart-4naturals
hair-typing-chart-4naturals
Many people wear trending styles in their hair like weave, they use heat to straighten it, and they even use chemicals like perms. All of these things can cause damage to the hair. As a result, people who suffer from hair damage have split ends, baldness, Alopecia Areata, and even permanent scalp damage. As a result to counter hair damage, many people are joining the natural hair movement. This is a movement that trending especially in the black community, where people are opting out of chemicals, heat, and anything damaging to their hair and choosing to wear their hair naturally and use natural hair products. 

I personally spend a lot of time maintaining my hair. Growing up, I had very thick hair that was difficult to manage. So when I was in 3rd grade, my mom decided to give me my first perm. This was the worse decision ever. When it was applied to my hair, it burnt my scalp so badly. Also a few weeks later, my hair started to fall out. The perm chemically altered the texture of my hair and severely damaged it. As the years went on, my hair eventually grew and I used a lot of heat styling. From 4th grade until 8th grade, my hair rapidly grew and I could see the difference in length each year. However past 8th grade, I wasn’t seeing much growth. My hair was shedding all over the place and it was very thin. I was very frustrated so I began to research how to make my hair grow and be healthy. The best option that I found was wearing my hair in its natural state. In January of 2014, I decided to go natural. It has been 2 ½ years since then and this was one of the best decisions that I have ever made. My hair is very healthy and has grown so much.
2016-06-01 23.07.25
2016-06-01 23.07.25
*My hair in heat styling in eight grade (2011).
DSC00052
DSC00052
​*My natural hair this year (2016).



Bibliography:
  • Sherrow, Victoria (2006). Encyclopedia of Hair: A Cultural History. 88 Post Road West, Westport, CT: Greenwood Press. p. iv.ISBN 0-313-33145-6.

  • Krause, K; Foitzik, K (2006). "Biology of the Hair Follicle: The Basics". Seminars in Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery 25: 2–10.doi:10.1016/j.sder.2006.01.002

  • "Common Causes of Damaged Hair That You Can Avoid." About.com Style. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 May 2016. <http://blackhair.about.com/od/blackhairproblems/a/damagedhair.htm>.

  • "The Hair Growth Cycle." Philip Kingsley. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 May 2016. <http://www.philipkingsley.com/hair-guide/hair-science/hair-growth-cycle/>.

  • "What Is Hair Made Of?" GrowHairGuru. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 May 2016. <http://growhairguru.com/what-is-hair-made-of/>.